"Shoot Suffrage to Death": A Short History of Race, Violence, and the Right to Vote - March 15, 2022

If you were not able to attend this excellent presentation, Ramsey County Library has provided a link to the recording: https://my.nicheacademy.com/rcladult/course/45833

In this session, Dr. Yohuru Williams, will explore the history of the use of violence to suppress voting in communities of color from the Reconstruction era to Present. Dr. Williams is Distinguished University Chair and Professor of History at the University of St. Thomas. He is the Founding Director of the Racial Justice Initiative at the university, and has often served as a political commentator on regional and national radio and television programs. The League of Women Voters Roseville Area and Ramsey County Library are excited to sponsor Dr. Williams in this important presentation. Reviewing the material in the following links will enhance the program experience:

Tags: 

Windows and Mirrors - Upwardly Mobile? - Florence Sprague - March 2022

It sounds so easy, so straightforward. Give someone who could not otherwise afford college a
scholarship and you give them access to a better life. But that transition is not always so easy or
straightforward. Listen to the stories of first-generation college students stumbling through school
unaware of the unstated “rules” and expectations of college. What are office hours? Where do my
parents belong in my life now? How do I socialize with classmates who have so much money?

Windows and Mirrors - (Ex) Termination - Florence Sprague - February 2022

How smooth must be the language of the whites, when they can make right look wrong, and wrong look right.

—Black Hawk, An Autobiography (quote seen on plaque embedded in the sidewalk in Iowa City)

Many LWVMN and LWV of Roseville Area events now incorporate an acknowledgement that our
communities are located on the ancestral lands of Native Americans, the Dakota and Ojibwe peoples here in
Minnesota. I did not initiate this custom, coming to it after hearing it at several events. We are all aware at
some level that the entire North American continent was totally reallocated, reorganized, and just outright
taken from indigenous peoples by European colonists due to orthogonal understandings of the concept of
property and a massive power differential. The land grants from European kings to early colonies had no
ethical foundation and treaties under which millions of acres of land were ceded in the 1800s were grossly
unfair.

CMAL Livable Communities Presentation - March 19, 2022

All LWV members and the public are invited to attend a Zoom presentation on the multi-million Livable Communities Act grant program, run by the Met Council pursuant to state law. We at CMAL hope that you will join us on Saturday March 19 at 10:00 am for a program about this metro area grant program that deals with affordable housing and brownfield clean-up. You can learn where the grant money comes from, where it goes, and whether it does any good.

Tags: 

March 2022 Voter

The latest issue of the Voter includes articles about:

  • The upcoming March 15 program Shoot Suffrage to Death: A Short History of Race, Violence, and the Right to Vote
  • Upwardly Mobile? article by Florence Sprague about the challenges strivers face
  • Plastic Crisis: Recycle What You Can - a helpful informative article
  • Climate Emergency: So Much to Lose as Minnesota cities are passing Climate Emergency resolutions or declarations

February 2022 Voter

In this issue of the Voter you will find articles about:

  • Consensus: Are Our Cities ADA Accessible?
  • A thought-provoking article, (Ex)Termination, by Florence Sprague
  • A recap of the January "Conversations with Constituents"
  • What is The Plastic Crisis Challenge for this month?

Windows and Mirrors -Two Signs - Florence Sprague - January 2022

Perhaps you saw it—an editorial page cartoon by Steve Sack in the Star Tribune in the summer of 2020—two houses, two neighbors chatting over the fence, and two signs in one yard. The signs say “Black Lives Matter” and “We Support Our Local Police.” One man is saying to the other man “If you think they conflict maybe it’s you with the problem.” It struck a chord.

I can see why they are so often thought to be orthogonal today. It needn’t be the case.

Perhaps the crux of the conflict comes in the intent behind “support.” For me, support means willingly paying taxes; endorsing a respectful, living wage for all public employees; backing good training for all public safety employees, both before and throughout employment; treating those public safety employees with whom I come into contact with respect, courtesy, and thanks as the situation warrants; and acknowledging the value of the job and the risks it entails.

Pages